IsWhere Image and Videos - Under Deveopment

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Geotagging Imagery and Video


IsWHERE is a log of my thoughts, reflections, and news/blog links on the emergence of image and video geospatial tagging. On May5th this year, I opened a second blog to deal with more detailed aspects of tools for FalconView and TalonView can be found at RouteScout. Trends I want to try and follow are the various disruptions resulting from spatial smart-phones, how many GPS devices are out there, smart-cameras, and other related news. And yes, I have a business interest in all of this. My company Red Hen has been pioneering this sort of geomedia for more than a decade.

So beyond a personal blog, I also provide a link to IsWHERE a shareware tool created by Red Hen Systems to readily place geoJPEG or geotagged imagery and soon GEM full motion media kept on your own computer(s) into Google Earth/Map from your File Manager media selection. Works great for geotagged images from Nikon, Ricoh, Sony, iPHONE, Android and all geo-smartphones that can create geotagged images. IsWhere - read about it

IsWhere Free Download (XP and VISTA)

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Saturday, July 21, 2007

One Billion Camera Phones in 2007 Alone

Jeremy Kirk - Computerworld

June 22, 2007 (IDG News Service) -- The number of mobile camera phones in use will top 1 billion this year, reflecting their tremendous growth rate since they hit the market around seven years ago, according to a new market evaluation.

Sales shot up from about 3 million camera phones in 2001 to 500 million last year, according to figures released Friday by Strategy Analytics Ltd. However, the growth will likely start to level off now, said Neil Mawton, an associate director at the market research company. Instead, people will upgrade existing camera phones, with manufacturers trying to entice them with high-end features that will dwarf what was available a few years ago, Mawton said. They will offer cameras with improved zoom capabilities, autofocus, better flashes and faster shutter speeds.

"In a way, [mobile manufacturers] are copying the digital still camera market," Mawton said.

Changes will also come inside the phones. The industry has typically used CCD (charged coupling device) sensors for taking digital photos, but that technology is ceding ground to a cheaper technology: CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor). CCD sensors are more expensive and less durable, but they provide a better image quality. However, CMOS chips are cheaper, more durable and have become more reliable, Mawton said. More suppliers make CMOS sensors than CCDs.

Not all phones will have cameras, since there will still be demand for phones in the $30-to-$40 range, Mawton said. Phones in those price ranges will be "camera-free for a good few years," he said.

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